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Marketing Java

It’s a Visual Marketing World

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Fast Company Visual Marketing“The future of marketing, it would seem, is visual,” a Fast Company piece declared. Our digital world has been evolving more visually with every new app and online domain developed. This evolution clearly shows that we are optically-inclined creatures, drawn to adorable, enticing pictures as well as clever, entertaining videos. The article continues: “Consumers easily view and create high-quality, provoking images every day, and never before have they been so adeptly attuned to taking away narrative details and brand value from a simple photo.”

Just as brainy marketers implement new visuals to their content to capture attention, targets of this information (the average consumer) are developing their own responses to the content they are exposed to online. From videos of product reviews to photos shared on social media, consumers are responding in visual ways to businesses and brands. This feedback – which is significant, not frivolous –  is part of the modern relationship between businesses and consumers, marketers and their audiences, and visual elements are essential components of these conversations.

“Navigating the web these days is increasingly a case of what you see is what you get,” a recent TechCrunch article accurately stated. “Sites like Pinterest and Tumblr, and apps like Instagram, Vine, and Snapchat are replacing text updates with images and videos as the primary mode of communication – and marketers and investors are taking notice.”

Dynamic graphics grab your audience’s attention and make people more likely to click through to your content and go to your website. More importantly, there needs to be a meaningful message behind the visual. Consumers’ expectations are higher than ever regarding the strategies used by marketers to reach them and actually make an impact. Visually speaking, today marketers should be inspired to get more creative, getting clicks by using original and imaginative graphics.

 

Photo credit: Fast Company

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